Book Review – SOLD by Patricia McCormick – a TGNA Post

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It’s Things I’ve Read Thursday over at The Great Noveling Adventure and I’m discussing SOLD by Patricia McCormick.

Here’s a preview:

SoldMy daughter started reading this to me on a road trip. She was so excited about this book that she had to share many of the passages. That kind of enthusiasm for a story is contagious. When I got around to reading it from start to finish myself, I felt the same way. The layout of the book and the style of writing read more like free verse poetry to me – put me in the mind of an Ellen Hopkins novel set in Nepal. The short chapters paint such vivid imagery of the day-to-day life of the young girls, both the innocent and horrifying, that you felt you were living in the story. I felt for these girls, for the main character Lakshmi, especially. I wanted to her escape and feared that she never would.

To read the full post, click here.

TweetI’ve taken a brief hiatus from AM #wordsprints this week for spring break. I’ll return bright and early next week, if you care to get your early writing work out started with some company. I host AM #wordsprints on Twitter @Novel_Adventure from 6-8am CST.

Writing Scenes with Umph! – a TGNA Post

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It’s List of Five Friday over at The Great Noveling Adventure and I’m discussing how to write believable settings into your work by giving some outstanding examples.

Here’s a preview:

As writers we know it’s important to set the stage for our story, to draw a picture in the reader’s mind of the world we’ve created so effortlessly that they can feel themselves a part of it.

Last weekend, while attending an all day critique event and leading some critique sessions, I found that getting a sense of place across was not an easy task for many beginning writers. The tendency was to include scene description by stopping in a doorway and giving an almost 360° turn around the room, describing all of the objects inside. Not very interesting. I explained how this stops the action cold and slows the pacing to a crawl. I offered some suggestions – a way to incorporate the all-important setting details without overwhelming or boring the reader – such as letting the description flow naturally while your character interacts with the environment. Break it up with action and dialogue. Give the details purpose.

To give some examples of what I’m talking about, and to again highlight why reading is so important for writers, my List of Five Friday is all about the writers who really know how to set a scene…

To read the full post, click here.

 

TweetSince we’re back from the holidays, I’m back to hosting AM #sprints every weekday morning on Twitter @Novel_Adventure. Join me if you need some motivation to get started or if you’d like some companionship as you work on your own great novel.

My Top Five Things for Friday – a TGNA Post

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It’s my turn to post over at the newly relaunched group blog, The Great Noveling Adventure. Since we now have set themes for each day, this is List of 5 Friday. I decided to give everyone a sneak peak at my top five favorite things I learned from the SCBWI LA Summer Conference. For those of you following along with my series of posts here, it’s a nice preview into some of the things I’ll be sharing more in-depth on this blog, coming very soon.

TweetDon’t forget that I’m also hosting AM #sprints every weekday morning on Twitter @Novel_Adventure. Join me if you need some motivation to get started or if you just need some companionship as you work on your own great novel.