The Relaxed & Groovy Book Club – BEAUTY QUEENS

 

Relaxed & Groovy Book Club

Welcome to the fourth discussion of the Relaxed & Groovy Book Club!

Returning to this right now is just what my creative spirit needs. Let’s talk books! And what better book than this one, the uplifting tale of beauty queens surviving on a deserted island, left to fend for themselves and discover what they’re really made of.

Current Relaxed & Groovy Book Club selection:

 

beauty queensBEAUTY QUEENS by Libba Bray

Published by: Scholastic Press

Release Date: May 24, 2011

Genres: YA, Contemporary, LGBT

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Plot Summary:

Teen beauty queens. A desert island. Mysteries and dangers. No access to e-mail. And the spirit of fierce, feral competition that lives underground in girls, a savage brutality that can only be revealed by a journey into the heart of non-exfoliated darkness. Oh, the horror, the horror! Only funnier. With evening gowns. And a body count. (Plot summary from author’s website.)

Learn more about Libba Bray here.

Follow Libba on Twitter here.

Follow Libba on Tumblr here.

Follow Libba on Facebook here.

I love the voice of this book! Libba Bray is hilarious and so talented at taking the absurd and making it funny while at the same time forcing us to look at an issue closer, with discernment.

Let’s peek at the opening and first chapter:

(It starts with a disclaimer, er, a word from your sponsor):

     This book begins with a plane crash. We do not want you to worry about this. According to the U.S. Department of Unnecessary Statistics, your chances of dying in a plane crash are one in half a million. Whereas your chances of losing your bathing suit bottoms to a strong tide are two to one. So, all in all, it’s safer to fly than to go to the beach. As we said, this book begins with a plane crash. But there are survivors. You see? Already it’s a happy tale. They are all beauty queen contestants. You do not need to know their names here. But you will get to know them. They are all such nice girls. Yes, they are nice, happy, shining, patriotic girls who happen to have interests in baton twirling, sign language, AIDS prevention in the animal population, the ancient preparation of popadam, feminine firearms, interpretive dance, and sequins. Such a happy story. And shiny, too.

     This story is brought to you by The Corporation: Because Your Life Can Always Be Better™. We at The Corporation would like you to enjoy this story, but please be vigilant while reading. If you should happen to notice anything suspicious in the coming pages, do alert the proper authorities. Remember, it could be anything at all – a subversive phrase, an improper thought or feeling let out of its genie bottle of repression, an idea that challenges the status quo, the suggestion that life may not be what it appears to be and that all you’ve taken for granted (malls, shopping, the relentless pursuit of an elusive happiness, prescription drug ads, those annoying perfume samples in magazines that make your eyes water, the way anchorman and women shift easily from the jovial laughter of a story about a dog that hula-hoops to a grave report on a bus crash that has left five teenagers dead) may be no more consequential than the tattered hem of a dream, leaving you with a bottomless, free-fall feeling.

     This is the sort of thing we are warning you about.

     But let’s not worry, shall we? There’s nothing to worry about. Though there is the threat of a war, it happens in the background, in snippets on the nightly news between ads for sinus medicines. It’s none of our concern. This is a happy story…

Chapter One

 “Are you all right?”

The voice was tinny in Adina’s ears. Her head ached, and she was wet. She remembered the plane pitching and falling, the smoke and screams, the panic, and then nothing.

“Am I dead?” she asked the face looming over hers. The face had apple cheeks and was framed by a halo of glossy black curls.

“No.”

“Are you dead?” Adina asked warily.

The face above her shook from side to side, and then burst into tears. Adina relaxed, reasoning that she had to be alive, unless the afterlife was a lot more bipolar than she’d been led to believe. She pulled herself to a sitting position and waited for the wooziness to subside. A gash on her knee was caked in dried blood. Another on her arm still seeped. Her dress was ripped and slightly scorched and she wore only one shoe. It was one half of her best pair, and in her state of shock, finding the other became important. “Can you help me find my shoe?”

“Sure. I saw some in the water. I hope they’re not leather,” the other girl said in an accent flat as a just-plowed field. She had huge, blue, anime-worthy eyes. “I’m Miss Nebraska, Mary Lou Novak.”

“Adina Greenburg. Miss New Hampshire.” Adina cupped her hands over her eyes, looking out toward the sea. “I don’t see it.”

“That’s a shame. It’s a real nice shoe.”

“Roland Me’sognie,” Adina said, and she honestly couldn’t figure out why. She didn’t care about the stupid brand. That was her mother’s influence. Shock. It had to be the shock.

“If I can find my suitcase, I’ve got an extra pair of sneakers in there. I’m a size eight.”

“Thanks.”

“You’re welcome. I like to be helpful. It’s sort of a Nebraska thing. My pageant sponsor says I’ve got a real good chance at Miss Congeniality this year.”

“Miss Congeniality represents the true heart of the pageant,” Adina found herself repeating from the Miss Teen Dream manual. She vaguely remembered that she used to make a gagging motion at that, but she was too dazed for snarkiness just now. Dazed because, yes, when she’d been looking for her shoe, she’d seen dead bodies in the water. Lifeless bodies.

This may appear to be your average story about a bunch of  beauty queens whose plane crashes leaving the survivors stranded on a deserted island with no plug-ins in sight, but as with all of Bray’s books, there is so much more depth and discovery underneath it all. A commentary on girl culture at its very core and a must-read for every young woman (and every young man! Insight is always wise to pursue. Besides, the male perspective is explored).

The Discussion:

The book is told from several points of view, each of the beauty queens gets to tell their tale, along with some interspersed commentary from The Corporation. When a new POV is introduced, we first get to review the character’s Miss Teen Dream Fun Facts Page. It’s fascinating to watch how each young woman’s view of herself changes – or the way she thought she should present herself to the world changes – as the experience on the island changes each of them.

Take this example:

Name: Adina Greenburg

State: New Hampshire

Age: 17

Height: I resent this question

Weight: I really resent this question.

Hair: Brown. Obviously.

Eyes: Also brown. Also obviously.

Best Feature: My intellect

Fun Facts About Me:

*I hate high heels. Walking in high heels for eight hours a day should be forbidden by the Geneva Convention.

*I am applying to Brown, Yale, Harvard, and Columbia.

*I was voted Most Likely to Figure Out Who Really Killed JFK.

* My mom is married to Alan, aka, Stepfather #5. He is a complete tool. No, you have no idea.

* My favorite Corporation TV show is the news. If you can call it that.

*My platform is Identifying Misogyny in American Culture. It’s all about helping girls ID the objectification of women when they see it. You know, like when girls are asked to parade around in bathing suits and heels and get scored on that.

*The thing that scares me most is falling in love with some jerkwad and ending up without an identity at all, just like my mom.

*I intend to bring this pageant down.

*You will never see this.

Adina only entered the contest to bring it down, so when she finds herself stranded on the island with her fellow contestants, she’s living in a nightmare scenario. She is such a hardcore, girl-power feminist in the beginning, yet as she gets to know the other girls beyond their platforms, she comes to embrace her softer side, and realizes that this doesn’t make you weak.

What’s also fascinating is watching how the young women use their pageant talents to help them survive. Of course, in the beginning some of them still have their sights set on winning the contest…

“For as long as we’re here, we need to survive. You know, build some shelter, find reliable food and drinking water. We need to organize.”

Taylor’s hand shot up, “Taylor Rene Hawkins of the great state of Texas! Permission to speak!”

“What fresh hell is this?” Adina muttered. “Granted.”

Taylor took back the baton. “Miss New Hampshire is right.”

“You’re agreeing with me?” Adina blurted out. “What are the other signs of the apocalypse?”

“You’re out of order, Miss New Hampshire. I’ll issue a warning. Next time it’s a penalty.” Taylor stood and paced with the baton cradled in her arms like a winner’s bouquet. “You know what I’m thinkin’,  Miss Teen Dreamers?”

“What?” Mary Lou asked.

“That was rhetorical, Miss Nebraska. I’m thinkin’ that when we do finally get rescued, we want them to find us at our best. And what could be better and more in line with the Miss Teen Dream mission statement than having them find that we have tamed and beautified this island? It’s like extra credit. And you know how the judges love extra credit.”

The island soon shows itself to be hostile and not so easily tamed. The young women who’ve broken up into two groups – the Lost Girls and the Sparkle Ponies (no, YOU’RE seeing parallels to LORD OF THE FLIES) – fight for survival harder than ever, even holding contests for best personal arsenal design.

After a long day of working hard on their creative survival skills, the young women open up around the campfire.

Miss Montana stared into the fire. “Sometimes I just want to go in a room and break things and scream. Like, it’s so much pressure all the time and if you get upset or angry, people say, ‘Are you on the rag or something?’ And it’s like I want to say, ‘No, I’m pissed off right now. Can’t I just be pissed off? How come that’s not okay for me?’ Like my dad will say, ‘I can’t talk to you when you’re hysterical.’ And I’m totally not being hysterical! I’m just mad. And he’s the one losing it. But then I feel embarrassed anyway. So I slap on that smile and pretend everything’s okay even though it’s not. Anyway.” Miss Montana pasted on an embarrassed half smile. “Sorry for the rant.”

“Why do you have to be sorry?” Nicole asked.

“Well…I don’t know.”

“Why do girls always feel like they have to apologize for giving an opinion or taking up space in the world? Have you ever noticed that?” Nicole asked. “You go on websites and some girl leaves a post and if it’s longer than three sentences or she’s expressing her thoughts about some topic, she usually ends with, “Sorry for the rant’ or ‘That may be dumb, but that’s what I think.'”

“I say sorry all the time. The other day, this lady bumped into me with her grocery cart, and I said I was sorry,” Mary Lou said, shaking her head.

Shanti raised her hand. “I move we officially ban the word sorry from our vocabularies while we’re here.”

“I second that, if that’s okay,” Petra said, grinning. “If not, sorry.”

“I third it. Sorry.”

“I just scratched my nose. Sorry.”

“I just scratched my ass. Sorry.

“I’m getting up to stretch my legs. Sorry.

“Sometimes I just want to burn down all the rules and start over,” Mary Lou said. Everyone waited for the punch line of “sorry,” but it never came.

The young women continue thrive while learning how to survive. They discover they are stronger than they thought.

The girls had lost track of how long they had been on the island. During the daylight hours, they dove into the surf with abandon, emerging tanned and sure-footed, as if they were selkies who had let their timidity float out on the tide like a false skin. Only Taylor remained vigilant in her pageant work, getting up every morning, rain or shine, to go through the paces of her routine, from first entrance to talent to final interview.

“When we get rescued, I guess I’m the only one who’ll be in fighting form,” she’d say while circle-turning and practicing a stiff wave.

“I’ve been thinking about the boys who crashed on the island,” Mary Lou said to Adina one afternoon as they rested on their elbows taking bites from the same papaya.

Lord of the Flies. What about it?”

“You know how you said it wasn’t a true measure of humanity because there were no girls and you wondered how it would be different if  there had been girls?”

“Yeah?”

Mary Lou wiped fruit juice from her mouth with the back of her hand. “Maybe girls need an island to find themselves. Maybe they need a place where no one’s watching them so they can be who they really are.”

Adina gazed out at the expanse of unknowable ocean. “Maybe.”

There was something about the island that made the girls forget who they had been. All those rules and shalt nots. They were no longer waiting for some arbitrary grade. They were no longer performing. Waiting. Hoping.

They were becoming.

They were.

The girls are thrown a curveball when a boatful of reality TV teenaged pirates show up and test their newfound girl power. If you thought it was interesting before the guys showed up, whew! You ain’t seen nothing!

Such an entertaining way to delve into the complex issue of gender roles and society influences. This book really makes you think. And I love a book that makes me think. I looooove Libba Bray. Once you read any of her books, I’m sure you will, too.

So…what’s next?

Relaxed & Groovy Book Club selection:

saveyou_bgI WILL SAVE YOU by Matt de la Peña

Published by: Delacorte Press

Release Date: October 12, 2010

Genres: YA, Contemporary, Realistic Fiction

 

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Plot Summary:

Kidd is running from his past and his future. No mom, no dad, and there’s nothing for him at the group home but therapy. He doesn’t belong at the beach where he works either, unless he finds a reason to stay.

Olivia is blond hair, blue eyes, rich dad. The prettiest girl in Cardiff. She’s hiding something from Kidd—but could they ever be together anyway?

Devon is mean, mysterious, and driven by a death wish. A best friend and worst enemy. He followed Kidd all the way to the beach and he’s not leaving until he teaches him a few lessons about life. And Olivia. (Plot summary from author’s website.)

Learn more about Matt de la Peña here.

Follow Matt on Twitter here.

Follow Matt on Facebook here.

This book wrecked me and, yet I’m coming back for seconds. If you’ve never read a book from this author, he’s one to get to know. Not only is he a fantastic guy in person, he does fantastic things for his readers. He’s not only heavily involved in the We Need Diverse Books project, his first picture book LAST STOP ON MARKET STREET won the 2016 Newbery Medal. Trust me, this is one author to follow.

The next meeting of this most relaxed and groovy of book clubs will be near the end of December. (Tie-dyed tees and funky shoes optional.)

Happy reading!

Year End #okscbwichat Round Up

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We had some fantastic #okscbwichats during my blog hiatus – a poet laureate, a literary agent, and an independent book store owner all stopped by our Twitter hashtag for a chat. We ended the 2016 #okscbwichat season at the end of last month with quite a bang.

Here’s the round up of the final chats and a link to each discussion.

Benjamin Myers

Ben MyersBenjamin Myers is a professor of literature at Oklahoma Baptist University and is the current Oklahoma Poet Laureate. He is the author of two books of poetry LAPSE AMERICANA and ELEGY FOR TRAINS, which won the Oklahoma Book Award for Poetry.

His poems may be read in numerous literary journals including The New York QuarterlyTar River Poetry, BorderlandsSalamander, Nimrod, and the Chiron Review, as well as online in Devil’s LakeDMQ ReviewThe Pedestal MagazineElimaePoetrybay, and elsewhere. He lives in Chandler, Oklahoma. You can follow Ben on Twitter.

Ben was our guest in September. During our Twitter chat, Ben talked about what inspired him to become a poet, how the study of poetry can help authors with their writing by calling very careful attention to language, and he explained how a poet uses a poem to convey a reader into an experience like Dr. Who uses his TARDIS. Fascinating!

*If you missed the chat, you can view the Storify version of the entire conversation here.

 

Adriana Domínguez

Adriana-DominguezAdriana Domínguez is a literary agent with Full Circle Literary with 20 years of experience in publishing. She will also be one of our off-site critiquers for our SCBWI OK Fall Workshop in November.

Her author client list includes award winners and best sellers such as Michaela and Elaine DePrince, Reyna Grande, Katheryn Russell-Brown and Angela Cervantes. Adriana is interested in picture books that are funny or endearing, with an element of the unexpected; voice-driven contemporary and historical middle grade and young adult novels, and narrative nonfiction, including biographies, and memoirs written by authors with strong platforms. Twists, strong concepts, and diverse points of view are all on her general wish list; works that are at once timely and timeless will always get her attention.

Adriana also represents artists with distinctive styles, and not-so-secretly yearns to bring more diverse illustrators into the market. You can visit her agency website to view her full bio and complete manuscript wishlist. You can also follow her on Twitter

Adriana was our guest for a special edition of #okscbwichat in early October. Adriana discussed diversity and who has the “right” to tell a story, she talked about how her experience as an editor influences her style as an agent, and she also told us one thing she wished new authors and illustrators knew about the publishing business.

*If you missed the chat, you can view the Storify version of the entire conversation here.

 

Joe Hight (BOB at Best of Books)

Joe HightJoe Hight is not only the president of Best of Books, an independent bookstore in Edmond, Oklahoma, he’s behind the online persona, BOB, and the delightful tweets of the store’s Twitter account @bestofbooksok.

Best of Books is a family-owned bookstore celebrating its 30th anniversary as an Edmond institution. Joe and his family took over ownership a few years ago after they moved back from Colorado Springs, Colorado, where Joe was the editor of The Gazette. While working there, his paper won the Pulitzer Prize. Prior to the move to Colorado, Joe worked for The Oklahoman. He was inducted into the Oklahoma Journalism Hall of Fame in 2013. You can follow Joe on Twitter.

Joe was our final #okscbwichat guest of the year. He chatted with us at the end of October. Joe shared many insights, including the one thing he wished local authors knew about their local bookstores – always seek to build relationships! He talked about the advantages an independent book store can offer an author over a chain book store as well. Joe discussed the mistakes authors can make when approaching them for events, he also shared some ideas that can help authors have more successful events. Very enlightening discussion.

*If you missed the chat, you can view the Storify version of the entire conversation here.

 

I really enjoyed all the conversations with our guests throughout this year. My Social Media Committee and I are already planning some exciting new things for next year! If you have any suggestions for a guest you’d like to see – author, illustrator, or industry professional – feel free to leave a comment. I’d love to hear from you!

See you back for our first #okscbwichat of 2017 in January!

#okscbwichat

 

 

 

SCBWI LA Summer Conference Impressions – Part 1

Artwork by Liz Wong
Artwork by Liz Wong

 

Yes, I’m back! I took some much needed time off from the blog to recharge my creative battery, which was getting frightfully low.

Part of that recharge included attending the 45th Annual SCBWI Summer Conference in Los Angeles with my tribe. I never feel more at home anywhere in the world than when I’m surrounded by these people. I always come away feeling fulfilled and motivated.

 

Biltmore Hotel Gallery Bar

We started out in a new venue this year, the (extremely haunted) Millennium Biltmore Hotel, which boasts many specters, one of the most famous being Elizabeth Short, known as the Black Dahlia, who was last seen in the bar before her death back in 1947.

Throughout the conference there were reports of doors and cabinets that refused to stay closed and bathtubs that filled up all on their own. Still, the spookiest thing that happened was when one of our own group from Oklahoma snapped a selfie all alone in the hallway of the infamous eighth floor. But it wasn’t quite a selfie – something was in the background behind her. It freaked everyone out who looked at it, I’m telling you. (If you’re really curious, just ask Ginny to show you sometime…at your own peril.)

DAY ONE

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Our Oklahoma SCBWI gang is ready for the conference to start!

Day One began with a marvelous welcome by the incomparable Lin Oliver and the always entertaining faculty parade. Then it was on to the first keynote.

Drew Daywalt Embraces His Inner Voice

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Drew Daywalt launched the conference with his keynote entitled “Does This Keynote Make My Butt Look Big?” And yes, it was just as funny as you would imagine. But it was also touching and inspiring as well. His first two picture books, THE DAY THE CRAYONS QUIT and the sequel, THE DAY THE CRAYONS CAME HOME have both been very successful. This is not something he was expecting. “I come from a long line of failed picture book writers.” crayonsquit

After growing up one of six kids in a house that was most likely haunted (sensing a theme for the weekend?) he started his adulthood writing screenplays in Hollywood, but found that world very unsatisfying and a little too cutthroat. He kept coming back to something author Jack Gantos once told him, that he had a voice for kids’ books. Yet, he kept put off writing for kids.

Then one day, he saw a box of crayons and thought about how they always had crayons but he never remembered buying them. He gave it a shot and wrote his first children’s book. Ten long years later – it took his agent four years to sell the book – it was published.

After his first school visit, a kid “broke through security” to give him a hug and kissed his cheek. He talked about how that experience changed him.

“Hollywood knocked me down, and a million tiny little hands caught me.”

(Yes, there was a collective “Awww” heard round the conference room at that.)

His picture books express a unique voice, a unique vision. When addressing the concept of voice, he said, “it is absolutely your fingerprint.”

Every story has been told, so it’s been said, but none in YOUR voice. You have to be willing to be vulnerable, too.

Writing a story and asking someone what they think about it is like standing there butt naked and saying, “Hey, do you like it?”

It’s about honesty.

You have to be honest to your own voice, and then you’ll be fine.

Fantastic way to open the conference!

 

Arthur Levine Gets Personal

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Moving into the workshop portion of the morning, the fabulous Arthur Levine, (Scholastic’s imprint Arthur A. Levine  – Harry Potter’s American publisher, that Arthur Levine) gave a talk entitled, “When It’s Personal: Translating Life into Fiction”. He’s also an author and has written several stories that have been inspired from his own life.

“Arguably, all good fiction is drawn from the personal.”  

How do we do this well? We take a story we care about that already has setting, emotions, and characters.

Blindspots are the problem.

When we’re telling personal stories to friends, we don’t have to be as careful about timelines, backgrounds, and setting. There’s a history built in with the audience.

When we try to translate these stories, we forget what’s visible. Interpersonal dynamics aren’t always clear. We don’t know how well this is showing up on the page. We still have all the work of creating characters that live on the page. It’s not visible unless we make it visible.

Sometimes memories aren’t complete. You may only have snippets of  memories from one event that don’t give you a cohesive story.  Diligent research can fill in for memory lapses.

Readers don’t know that you’re mixing and matching as long as it works and there’s fidelity.

Your stories and anecdotes are tools.

What are you trying to say? Does this plot support that? If not, you need to change it. The more changes you make, the more distance and objectivity it gives you.

“Feelings are clothing that other characters can wear – have to tailor to fit.”

Many great ideas for future stories came out of this session!

 

LUNCH!!!

The great thing about our new location is that we were smack in the middle of downtown LA and there was so much going on around us and so much waiting to be explored. After dreading the long line at the hotel café, I saw a tweet mentioning food trucks across the street. Not only food trucks, but live music, and a beyond fascinating moving art sculpture canopy. Lunch time was saved!

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Never-ending line for the café. Blerg.

 

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Food trucks to saved the day!

 

 

 

 

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Me squinting in the ever-so-bright California sunshine while trying to capture the constantly moving reflective sculpture/canopy thingy behind me. (NOT a professional photographer.)

 

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Over head shot of the full floaty art sculpture canopy. Looks like a school of shiny minnows. You can peek through it and see the high rise buildings above.

 

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More floaty sculpture and lunch date, my daughter. Notice the enormous shadows this thing casts on the ground.

 

Sara Sargent Cuts to the Edge of YA Fiction

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Sara Sargent speaking in the very intimidating Crystal Ballroom
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The room was packed and I felt way under-dressed for the décor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a fascinating lunch time diversion, and a few more interesting talks,  came a brilliant workshop by HarperCollins Executive Editor Sara Sargent. I just love her – and not because she remembered me from our Spring 2016 SCBWI OK conference and gave me a hug while we were in a crowded elevator together. I’ve never had an editor do that!

Sara’s talk was entitled, “Cutting Edge YA Fiction”. She started at HarperCollins about a year ago to develop books that teens really want to read. She studied these teens in-depth. She thought we should get to know these readers, understand them, “and dare say, even love them”.

What a radical concept!

Here’s some marketing data on this Gen Z:

  • They are the 1st generation to be majority non-white
  • Have an average attention span of 8 seconds
  • Use an average of 5 devices – smart phone, laptop, desktop, tablet, TV
  • More tolerant of gender diversity than previous generations

Their experience at school is totally different than what your was.

**One of the main reasons Sara rejects a manuscript is because it seems like the author is writing to the teen they were instead of to who teens are today.

Excellent point.

Who are you telling the story for? Do you know today’s teen audience?

Sara then gave many ideas on how an author could immerse themselves in teen culture to see what teens today are interested in.

So what does ‘cutting edge’ mean? It plays with expectation and form. To Sara, it’s pushing boundaries and trying new things – “Making me think in new ways.”

Here are some brainstorming ideas to get you started:

  •  Using Adult Novels for Brainstorming – What exciting things are your favorite adult authors doing that you’re not seeing in YA? Same goes for TV shows, movies, webisodes, and Youtube.
  • Backward/Parallel Universe – Think BEFORE I FALL by Lauren Oliver or Sliding Doors movie
  • Using Video Game as a Framework – Like Ready Player One.
  • Complete Opposite – Instead of something to escape FROM, give characters something to escape INTO.
  • Think about a world that has one element our world doesn’t have – one element. Take it away or add it. Think Pleasantville and color.
  • At the Plot -level – Think about character dynamics. Does the football player always need to be popular?
  • Period of time – Play with the limit of time your story takes place – 24 hours, a couple of hours. How would this change/affect a story?

There were so many great ideas. You can rethink storylines and come up with something innovative. The one point she made at the end was that you can be cutting edge while staying true to your own story.

DINNER!!!

Only way to top the first day of great speakers was with dessert…

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Chocolate with chocolate sauce and more chocolate inside? Heaven!
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Me and one of my writer friends from our Oklahoma group, Ginny. (Yes, of the infamous spooky photo.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And more relaxing time with my writer friends at the Golden Kite Awards Dinner.

My artistic soul on the mend at the end of Day One.

More to come!

 

September #okscbwichat – Special Guest Brett Wright

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I co-hosted this month’s #okscbwichat on Tuesday evening with our Special Guest, Bloomsbury Editor Brett Wright.

Brett Wright

Brett-WrightBrett Wright is an Editor at Bloomsbury Children’s Books, where he’s worked for the past five years on everything from picture books through YA. He will also be one of our off-site critiquers for our SCBWI OK Fall Workshop in October.

He has worked with authors like E.D. Baker, Jennifer Brown, Nikki Grimes, Carrie Jones, Paul Tobin, Sarah Crossan, and many more. He has also written three books in Random House Children’s OMG Shakespeare series, including Yolo Juliet. He lives in New York, NY. You can follow Brent on Instagram or Twitter.

During our Twitter chat, Brett talked about what he looks for in a manuscript and what he doesn’t. He discussed the rise in demand for issue-driven Middle Grade books and why that seemed to be. Brett also discussed what it was like to turn the tables and work as a writer. His OMG Classics series books are written in modern texting and emoji to make the language of the bard more accessible. Brett found working as an author quite challenging. Brett had many other insightful things to say during the chat.

Brett will be critiquing manuscripts for our SCBWI OK October Fall Workshop. Although all critique spots for our October SCBWI OK Fall Workshop are taken, any attendees will be able to submit to Brett for a limited time. For more information about the workshop, visit the SCBWI OK website.

 

*If you missed the chat, you can view the Storify version of the entire conversation here.

 

**Later this month, we have our regularly scheduled #okscbwichat with very special guest Benjamin Myers, the current Oklahoma Poet Laureate, and son of our SCBWI OK Resident Advisor Emeritus, Anna Myers. Join us for our next chat on Tuesday, September 27th!

 

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To see a full list of our upcoming Twitter chats on #okscbwichat for 2016 CLICK HERE.

 

July #okscbwichat – Special Guest Brenda Drake

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I co-hosted this month’s #okscbwichat on Tuesday evening with our Special Guest, YA author Brenda Drake.

Brenda Drake

Brenda-Drake-Author-Photo2Brenda Drake, the youngest of three children, grew up an Air Force brat and the continual new kid at school until her family settled in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Brenda’s fondest memories growing up are of her eccentric, Irish grandmother’s animated tales, which gave her a strong love for storytelling. So it was only fitting that she would choose to write young adult and middle grade novels with a bend toward the fantastical. When Brenda’s not writing or doing the social media thing, she’s haunting libraries, bookstores, and coffee shops or reading someplace quiet and not at all exotic (much to her disappointment).

Brenda is the host of the ever-popular Pitch Wars, Pitch Madness, and the Twitter pitch of all pitches, #pitmad. Brenda will be discussing what it’s like to host these mind-boggling contests, and how in the world she still makes time to write! Her debut novel, THIEF OF LIES: A Library Jumpers Novel, experienced a very successful release this month.

Follow Brenda on Twitter here.

During our Twitter chat, Brenda talked briefly of her own perilous journey to publication before we got into the topic for the evening, online writing contests like Pitch Wars and #pitmad. Brenda discussed the ins and outs of running Pitch Wars, and how it all got started. She explained the mentoring process for those who make it into the contest, and talked about why it is so beneficial for a writer to consider being a part of Pitch Wars in the first place.

As an added bonus, Brenda’s right-hand helper, Heather Cashman, joined in the conversation. The chat was an outstanding success and extremely informative. If you’ve ever considered entering a contest like this, you really should look into Pitch Wars. The next installment starts soon!

*If you missed the chat, you can view the Storify version of the entire conversation here.

**Next month, we have our first topic #okscbwichat, Support Through Social Media! This will follow a special SCBWI MEMBERS ONLY event planned on Saturday, August 20th, right before our regular #okscbwichat. We will be hosting a Social Media Hangout in both Tulsa and Oklahoma City where we will be sharing ideas on how we can better support our fellow members by using social media – from pre-ordering books to posting reviews to using Goodreads effectively.

The Twitter chat on August 23rd will complement this event. We will share ideas we learned at the Hangout during the chat. For more information, check our calendar of events on the SCBWI OK website.

 

See you for the next Twitter chat on Tuesday, August 23rd!

#okscbwichat

 

To see a full list of our upcoming Twitter chats on #okscbwichat for 2016 CLICK HERE.

 

July Flash Fiction Prompt

FLASH FICTION PROMPT

It’s been awhile since I’ve done a Flash Fiction Prompt, and now felt like the right time to get back to it, especially since I need to come up with a fantastic idea for our TGNA Fall Frivolity anthology.

And in keeping with the fall theme for our anthology,

Here’s the visual prompt for July…

 

slevin-aaron-11-360x524

Photo credit Slevin Aaron

 

Write a story inspired by this image in 1000 words or less.

If you’d like to share your story, email it to me at valerierlawson@gmail.com. Put Flash Fiction Prompt in the subject line.

I’ll share my story next month. (This may or may not be the story I include in our TGNA anthology. It’ll be a surprise.) I may post yours here, too. If I have enough people participate, I’ll post the best one on the blog!

If you are interested in entering a submission for our anthology, you can view more writing prompt ideas on our TGNA group Pinterest page. You can also view the submission guidelines on our blog. I look forward to reading your submissions!

 

 

Book Review – GEORGE by Alex Gino – a TGNA post

 

tgnahead

 

After a nice long break from participating in the The Great Noveling Adventure blog, I’ve decided to join the group again. I just missed it too much. I’ll only be posting once a month, which will be much easier on me and will allow me to pursue my other goals without becoming a burden.

Today is my day for July, and I’m posting a book review of that fantastic Middle Grade novel GEORGE by Alex Gino.

Here’s a preview:

Book Review George

Hello Adventurers! It’s wonderful to be back after a much needed break. I’ve kept busy on my own blog and have managed to do a fair amount of reading while I’ve been away. One of my favorite reads so far this year has been this slim, unassuming book with the simple design that packs quite an emotional punch. Leave it to a Middle Grade author to tackle such a huge topic like transgender and to get it so right. This is an important book that needs to be shared – with young and old alike.

On to the review!

To read the full post, click here.

We are also putting together TGNA’s second anthology, FALL FRIVOLITY, and you can be a part of it! To be considered, simply submit a short story of 1000 words or less with a fall theme to tgnasubmissions@gmail.com. We’re accepting submissions through August 1st. For full submissions guidelines, click here!